KnowledgeBase: Tips and Tricks for the Use of CAPL

CAPL (Communication Access Programming Language) is a procedural programming language similar to C, which was developed by Vector Informatik. The execution of program blocks is controlled by events. CAPL programs are developed and compiled in a dedicated browser. This makes it possible to access all of the objects contained in the database (messages, signals, environment variables) as well as system variables. In addition, CAPL provides many predefined functions that support working with the CANoe and CANalyzer development, testing and simulation tools.

In three consecutive articles, CAPL fundamentals will be discussed as well as tips for all levels of user knowledge.

Part 1: CAPL Basics

It focuses on the basics of CAPL. It is primarily intended for those who are new to this language; however, it also offers a few insights for well-informed users into the motivation behind individual CAPL constructs.

Technical Article from Marc Lobmeyer and Roman Marktl (English edition) (published in CAN Newsletter, issue 2/2014)

Technical Article from Marc Lobmeyer and Roman Marktl (German edition) (published in CAN Newsletter, issue 2/2014)

Part 2: Effectively Apply CAPL

This CAPL article explains the time behavior of event procedures. It also offers tips for all types of users so that they can work effectively with CAPL in the areas of "generic programming" and "conditional compiling."

Technical Article from Marc Lobmeyer and Roman Marktl (English edition) (published in CAN Newsletter, issue 3/2014)

Technical Article from Marc Lobmeyer and Roman Marktl (German edition) (published in CAN Newsletter, issue 3/2014)

Part 3: CAPL for Advanced Users

This part is the last one of the CAPL article series. It presents tips and tricks for advanced CAPL users. Topics include associative arrays, performance, memory needs, and other database access options.

Technical Article from Marc Lobmeyer and Roman Marktl (English edition) (published in CAN Newsletter, issue 4/2014)

Technical Article from Marc Lobmeyer and Roman Marktl (German edition) (published in CAN Newsletter, issue 4/2014)